Facets of Community Episode 3: Care


Each year the FBCR congregation sets aside a few weeks for reflection. We reflect collectively on who we are as a church, and we reflect individually on how we relate to the church at large. From now through Sunday, November 7, 2021 I want to invite our faith community to consider broadly what it means to live in community together. Toward that end, we will highlight nine different facets of community, nine ways by which our community takes shape.

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Heads Up! I refer to this episode as episode 2 but it is episode 3 in our 9-part series.

At Wednesday night forum last night, we talked about the concept of stewardship and how we might move away from thinking about stewardship in a purely financial sense and towards a model that includes how we choose to use the resources life has given each of us.

One of these resources we have at FBCR is time. Some of us have more time than others, but all of us, no matter how busy we are, have at least a little bit. When our group was chatting about this on Wednesday night, we agreed that resources are tools that we use to strive towards a goal; one of the central goals of our community at FBCR is to care for one another.

Institutions often revolve around care: Hospitals revolve around the care of people’s bodies and often psyches. The academy—another important institution a lot of us have passed through—focuses on the care of people’s minds and perspectives. The church, an institution that has shaped all our lives, revolves around the care of souls, as well as our bodies and brains.

Some questions come up for me here: 

  • How does the type of care that the church can offer differ from that offered by other institutions? Does it differ at all?
  • How might the autonomous way we govern ourselves as Baptists shape how we reach out to one another?
  • Is there anything theologically significant about the fact that we have so many lay people here who share in the work of compassionate care and outreach?
  • What might this distinction reveal to us about God?

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